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Wednesday, November 30, 2011

New from War Horse: Off-Screen Actors Speak on the Film (and the Horse)


A new two-minute trailer from Dreamworks Pictures juxtaposes the off-screen stars of the new Steven Spielberg film War Horse with their on-screen characters. What do the actors have to say about the film, what it means, and what's at the heart of a horse's journey into the swirling maelstrom of war?

The momentum is building for the premiere of this film in the USA on Christmas Day. To learn more, follow @warhorsenews on Twitter.

Silver-mounted hoof of ‘Jim’, the horse of Trumpeter W H Barrett, Royal Horse Artillery, c1920. NAM. 1989-06-42

Speaking of World War I, which this blog will be doing often in the runup to the premiere of War Horse, here's a fascinating artifact from the National Army Museum in London, which is currently hosting a War Horse exhibit.

They named this object "Jim's Hoof" and describe it this way: "Trumpeter W H Barrett rode Jim throughout the First World War (1914-18). Unlike so many other horses, he made it back to Britain alive and in 1919 was presented to Queen Alexandra by the British commander-in-chief, Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig."

I'm sure it must be the photo, but it doesn't look silver on my computer screen. And do you notice anything about Jim's hoof? You're right: no nail holes. How is the shoe attached to the hoof? Why did they choose to cover the heel bulbs that way?

Perhaps this priceless artifact was the inspiration for the Shoe Secure heel guards from Scotland.

Also from the National Army Museum, but pre-dating World War I is this memorial to a favorite polo pony of Captain Sherer of the 49th (Bengal) Native Infantry in India. He is often credited with bringing the sport to Europe.



The museum tells us that though there is no inscription to suggest that it was awarded as a trophy, it is among the earliest examples of polo memorabilia (1865) belonging to a British Officer; they assure us that both hooves are from the same pony.

Looking at this photos, do you think that Captain Sherer commissioned a silversmith or a farrier to make the  silver horseshoes?

 TO LEARN MORE
War Horse Television Commercial (November 2011)
First War Horse Movie Trailer (June 2011)


Call the Hoofcare + Lameness Office: 978 281 3222 or send an email for details!


© Fran Jurga and Hoofcare Publishing; Fran Jurga's Hoof Blog is a between-issues news service for subscribers to Hoofcare and Lameness Journal. Please, no use without permission. You only need to ask. This blog may be read online at the blog page, checked via RSS feed, or received via a digest-type email (requires signup in box at top right of blog page). To subscribe to Hoofcare and Lameness (the journal), please visit the main site, www.hoofcare.com, where many educational products and media related to equine lameness and hoof science can be found. Questions or problems with this blog? Send email to blog@hoofcare.com.  
Follow Hoofcare + Lameness on Twitter: @HoofcareJournal
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Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any direct compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned, other than Hoofcare Publishing. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Tuesday, November 29, 2011

Oklahoma Zebra with Foot Infection Loses the Battle

This video is a window on the earlier treatment of Zephra, a Grevy's zebra with a serious hoof infection at the Oklahoma City Zoo; video courtesy of The Oklahoman. The video may take a little while to load. (sorry about the ad)

For quite a while now, I've been following the travails of a Grevy's zebra at the Oklahoma City Zoo. Zephra has reportedly been treated for laminitis for the past three months or so. Carrie Coppernoll, a journalist with the local newspaper, the Oklahoman, was willing to share her report and the paper also has a video, which details treatment of an abscess or infection.

Carrie's reports have been beautifully illustrated with photos by the Oklahoman's photographer, Paul Hellstern. 

Today Carrie Coppernoll shared the outcome of the case.

Sadly, Zephra didn't survive her foot problem. Carrie has kindly shared some of her report, which appeared in The Oklahoman today. Carrie attributes her information to Jennifer D'Agostinodirector of veterinarian services at the Oklahoma City Zoo.

Dee Corley (left), Zoo Equine Podiatrist, Animal Keeper Brian Whitsitt, and Senior Veterinarian Jennifer D'Agostino attempt to take an X-ray, as work is done to treat an abscessed hoof on "Zephra", a Grevy's zebra at the Oklahoma City Zoo  on Tuesday, October 25, 2011. By Paul Hellstern, © The Oklahoman

In August, Zephra was diagnosed in August with laminitis of unknown origin. According to D'Agostino, the zebra's pain was temporarily relieved when the zoo's farrier applied a shoe to the hoof.

Carrier writes: "But Zephra began to limp again, and a more extensive exam revealed a painful abscess. She was immobilized several times so experts from throughout the state could help treat her. Because Grevy's zebras are wild and aggressive, Zephra had to be anesthetized for each treatment.


A bird's eye view of work done to treat an abscessed hoof on "Zephra", a Grevy's zebra at the Oklahoma City Zoo on October 25, 2011. By Paul Hellstern, © The Oklahoman

'Despite treatment, her pain and the infection wouldn't go away,' D'Agostino said. 'The tip of the bone inside her hoof was dying. The only solution was surgery'."

Henry Jann, an equine surgeon from Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, performed the surgery November 10. 

According to Coppernoll's report, the surgeon created an opening into the sole of the zebra's hoof, removed the dead bone, packed it with antibiotics and wrapped it in a hard cast.

Senior Veterinarian Jennifer D'Agostino (right) and Dee Corley, Zoo Equine Podiatrist, work to treat an abscessed hoof on "Zephra", a Grevy's zebra at the Oklahoma City Zoo on October 25, 2011. Photo by Paul Hellstern, © The Oklahoman
Coppernoll continues: "Zephra showed a lot of promise for the next week, D'Agostino said. 'She was doing great, She was walking without hardly any limp.'

However, Coppernoll reported, Zephra quickly deteriorated. She wrote "The infection got worse and her foot began separating from the hoof. Zoo officials cleaned her and gave her another day. 

"But when they unwrapped the bandages on November 23, they knew the problem was too much for her to overcome."

D'Agostino said. 'As soon as we took the bandage off,' she said, 'we knew'.”

Zephra was euthanized.



In this video, a zoo zebra in Tokyo paws a steel plate.

Coppernoll continues: "Zephra's body has been donated to Skulls Unlimited. Her bones will either end up on display at the Museum of Osteology or become part of an educational exhibit, D'Agostino said.

She quoted the veterinarian: “The whole time we thought it was all going to be fine. The infection got the better of her,” she said. “We knew that this was the road it could go down.”

Dr. Jennifer D’Agostino, senior veterinarian for the Oklahoma City Zoo, looks at an X-ray, as an abscessed hoof is treated on Zephra at the Oklahoma City Zoo. Photo by Paul Hellstern, ©The Oklahoman Archives

Many zoo animals receive infrequent hoofcare services because of restraint issues and the danger involved. Some zoos have elaborate training projects to improve the quality and frequency of their hoof trimming for the animals.

Another encouraging post script to the Oklahoma story is that many of the glue-on and strap-on products used on horses have been adapted for zoo animals so that their hooves can be supported or stabilized with minimal trauma. In the past, it was difficult to figure out how to apply a brace, for example, that could be used on zoo animals.

Shoot big game...with hoof adhesives.
Vettec adhesive and supportive urethane-based products have been used quite a bit in zoos, as have PMMA adhesive products, I know, and I would imagine that casting tape would come in handy.

Will hoof boots in sizes and shapes to fit exotic animals be the next thing on our new products page?

In the months to come, Hoofcare + Lameness will be exploring some of the advances in zoo husbandry and medicine. I look forward to seeing the first business card reading "Equine and Exotic Podiatry Services"!

If you have photos or experiences or opinions or innovations to share, please contact Fran Jurga.

Hoofcare Publishing thanks Carrie Coppernoll, Paul Hellstern and The Oklahoman for their excellent reporting and their assistance with this report.

 TO LEARN MORE

Read the full newspaper article about the zebra's earlier treatment in Oklahoma City, with additional photos.
Read Carrie Coppernoll's full article about the zebra's final prognosis during the week of Thanksgiving, published November 29.
Association of Zoos and Aquariums
Read The Rhino With the Glue-On Shoes by Lucy Spelman DVM to learn how the Forging Ahead farrier practice in Virginia sent an unflinching Randy Pawlak to help Mohan, a 5000-pound rhinocerous, with the tools he uses for sport horses.

Click on the photo to learn more and order your poster.


© Fran Jurga and Hoofcare Publishing; Fran Jurga's Hoof Blog is a between-issues news service for subscribers to Hoofcare and Lameness Journal. Please, no use without permission. You only need to ask. This blog may be read online at the blog page, checked via RSS feed, or received via a digest-type email (requires signup in box at top right of blog page). To subscribe to Hoofcare and Lameness (the journal), please visit the main site, www.hoofcare.com, where many educational products and media related to equine lameness and hoof science can be found. Questions or problems with this blog? Send email to blog@hoofcare.com.  
 
Follow Hoofcare + Lameness on Twitter: @HoofcareJournal
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Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any direct compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned, other than Hoofcare Publishing. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

Spielberg's War Horse Movie Television Commercial: Here Comes a Great Film!

It doesn't open in theaters until Christmas, but the television commercial is ready to roll. We all know Santa Claus is coming to town, but so is War Horse; Mr. Spielberg's epic story of what war looks like through the eyes of a horse opens on Christmas Day. Two tickets and a promise to buy the popcorn will make a great gift for anyone you know.

Back to the commercial: Hoof Blog readers will notice immediately that the horse is lame, which may 1) spur your interest in seeing the film, or 2) make you wonder how a horse trainer gets a sound horse to limp on command.

Click on the arrows at the lower right to watch the clip in full-screen mode. It's worth it.

The Hoof Blog will have much more information about War Horse as the launch approaches. the interest in the film is unearthing all sorts of information, images and film footage about hoofcare and farriers in World War I that the Hoof Blog is hoping to share.

Until then, as they say in the film: be brave!

 TO LEARN MORE
Put this amazing reference book at the top of your Christmas wish list!
Call to order 978 281 3222.


© Fran Jurga and Hoofcare Publishing; Fran Jurga's Hoof Blog is a between-issues news service for subscribers to Hoofcare and Lameness Journal. Please, no use without permission. You only need to ask. This blog may be read online at the blog page, checked via RSS feed, or received via a digest-type email (requires signup in box at top right of blog page). To subscribe to Hoofcare and Lameness (the journal), please visit the main site, www.hoofcare.com, where many educational products and media on equine lameness and hoof science can be found. Questions or problems with this blog? Send email: blog@hoofcare.com.  
Follow Hoofcare + Lameness on Twitter: @HoofcareJournal
Read this blog's headlines in your Facebook news feed when you "like" the Hoofcare + Lameness Facebook Page
 
Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any direct compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned, other than Hoofcare Publishing. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Thanksgiving: Shoes for Turkeys? The Trot to Market Was Hard on Their Feet

Shoeing the Goose misericord carving photographed by Giles C. Watson

This blog post is an update on one of the most popular posts ever published on this blog. First published for Thanksgiving 2008, people from all over the world have remarked on this unusual bit of history, which is little known but can always fill in the gaps of a slow conversation with the relatives on a holiday afternoon.

Be thankful for many things this Thanksgiving. Among them: be thankful you don't have to shoe turkeys or help them with their lameness problems. Turkey feet were a major concern up until 100 years or so ago, when the railroads took over transporting livestock to market. Up until then, turkeys took to the highway on foot to be sold in the big cities. Unfortunately, turkey feet weren't made for trotting.

If the conversation lags around the dinner table during your Thanksgiving feast, pick up a drumstick and speculate straight-faced to some young relative, "Ever notice that no one ever eats turkey feet?"

Chances are, it never occurred to a child to question why the drumstick is an amputee.

Then answer your own question nonchalantly: "They used to shoe turkeys, you know."

Then wait. It's coming.

All eyes will turn to you. In-laws will raise eyebrows. Children will hold you in high esteem. Any dogs lying in wait will wag their tails.

And the medallion above, from a medieval church, proves it, even though that is a goose carved into a misericord, a sort of jump-seat ledge in church pews. (I highly recommend following the link to Giles Watson's site.) The goose appears to be stabilized in a stock and the farrier is hammering on its webbed foot.

Before railroads, the only way for turkeys and geese to get to market was to herd them along country roads. Drovers would purchase or consign them from multiple farmers and move great flocks toward the cities so they could be sold for Thanksgiving or Christmas dinners.

A Turkey Named Paul
How far do you think this turkey would be able to trot? Would he look the same when he arrived at the market? (Mark Robinson photo)

You would hear the poultry flocks, and see the dust clouds, long before they passed through your town. The poultry could eat among the stubble of harvested fields as they went. The drover didn't hurry them too much, since fatter birds meant higher prices for him.

Historically, New England writers like Hawthorne and Emerson wrote complaining comments about the huge flocks of turkeys clogging up the roads and impeding the post or the stagecoach.

Click here to listen to a Vermont Public Radio lecture about the great turkey droves to Boston for Thanksgiving.  
The problem was that the birds' feet and claws weren't cut out to march a few hundred miles. Turkeys were famous for just refusing to move, or they would roost up in trees for the night and not come down in the morning, perhaps because their feet were sore. Geese apparently were even more lame than turkeys because of their webbed feet.

Cattle, too, had a hard time marching to market, and were often shod along the way. In fact, farriers were in great demand to accompany drovers so that the cattle could be shod or attended to as needed along the route. Even pigs and sheep and goats had to be shod occasionally, although the old animal husbandry books tell us that pigs preferred woolen socks with a leather sole to shoes.

Buying the Thanksgiving turkey, circa 1910; double-click to enlarge and see detail. Library of Congress image

The drover's wagon followed slowly behind the drover, who was often on foot, with his dogs. The wagon picked up strays, or sick or lame birds. They stopped at drovers' inns, and pastured stock in rented or loaned fields (and trees) overnight.

I don't know how the geese were shod in Europe, but I have read that is was some crafty New Englanders who figured out a simpler way to do it. They developed a series of pits along the drovers' routes. In the first pit was warm tar; the turkeys and geese were herded into the pen and left for a bit, then moved to the second pen, which was sand. The sand, of course, stuck to the tar and made a gritty set of galoshes for the birds. About the time the tar wore off, they would arrive at the next set of pits.

It gives a new twist to the expression, "tarred and feathered", not to mention a "turkey trot".

It also explains why turkeys are rarely, if ever, sold with their feet still attached to their drumsticks.

Some cooks add these little paper "turkey feet" if serving the whole bird on a platter.  The tradition of roasting poultry without their feet may have a very practical origin. Photo courtesy of the Folding Trees blog.

Giles introduced me to an ancient Reynard the Fox ditty:

"It’s easier to revive a corpse
Robbed from a hangman’s noose
Than to stoop with iron nails
And shoe your grandma’s goose.

Bend your back, you farrier,
The goose foot on your knee,
And watch the locals gather round
And chortle for to see.

It’s easier to make sure a tooth
That’s grey and hanging loose
Than to stoop with iron nails
And shoe your grandma’s goose.

And if the goose should give a honk
As you are a-nailing
You’ll never make a goose’s smith –
‘Tis a sign that you are failing.

You’ll tear your hair out, feathers fly,
It won’t be any use,
For I’d rather shoe my grandma
Than shoe my grandma’s goose."

Happy Thanksgiving! I'm very thankful for the people who read this blog and support Hoofcare Publishing and are my friends, even if we have never met. Thank you, most of all, for helping the horses.

 TO LEARN MORE

A history of drovers in America, including the race between geese and turkeys.

© Fran Jurga and Hoofcare Publishing; Fran Jurga's Hoof Blog is a between-issues news service for subscribers to Hoofcare and Lameness Journal. Please, no use without permission. You only need to ask. This blog may be read online at the blog page, checked via RSS feed, or received via a digest-type email (requires signup in box at top right of blog page). To subscribe to Hoofcare and Lameness (the journal), please visit the main site, www.hoofcare.com, where many educational products and media related to equine lameness and hoof science can be found. Questions or problems with this blog? Send email to blog@hoofcare.com.  
Follow Hoofcare + Lameness on Twitter: @HoofcareJournal
Read this blog's headlines on the Hoofcare + Lameness Facebook Page
 
Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any direct compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned, other than Hoofcare Publishing. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Sunday, November 20, 2011

AAEP Laminitis Research Project Launched: Phase One to Investigate Pasture or Endocrinopathy-Associated Laminitis with Help of Boehringer Ingelheim Prascend® Donation

(This information is an edited press release that was originally provided by the AAEP Foundation)



On Saturday, the American Association of Equine Practitioners Foundation announced the launch of an aggressive $1 million campaign for laminitis research and the start of the first of multiple studies that will occur to help unravel the mysteries of this disease.

Also announced at the AAEP’s 57th Annual Convention was the donation of $200,000 to the AAEP Foundation for support of the first study Case-Control Study of Pasture or Endocrinopathy Laminitis supported by Prascend® (pergolide mesylate), manufactured by Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica.

“This project is in response to AAEP members prioritizing laminitis as the most important disease requiring research,” said Wayne McIlwraith, BVSc, PhD, FRCVS. “We are fortunate and very grateful our long-time industry partner Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. and their new exciting product Prascend® is willing to support research to help us help horses with this devastating disease.”

Professor Wayne McIlwraith
Laminitis remains one of the most frustrating and devastating diseases confronted by equine practitioners. The disease, which has the potential to cripple horses beyond repair, damages the critical laminae structures in the equine foot and has a variety of causes and symptoms.

"Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. (BIVI) is very pleased to fund this continued research on equine laminitis," says Dr. Jane Smith, director, BIVI equine division. "We truly value the work of AAEP and their Foundation and are proud to partner with them in this research effort."

The Case-Control Study of Pasture or Endocrinopathy Laminitis is already underway under the direction of recognized epidemiologist, Noah Cohen, VMD, PhD at theTexas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine.

Through the Laminitis Research Project, top equine researchers, AAEP members and horse owners will work together to lay a foundation for the future of laminitis research. With new information about nature of this disease, the AAEP Foundation intends to equip equine practitioners with the ability to prevent and treat horses diagnosed with laminitis.

Veterinarians and horse owners are encouraged to join the effort to eradicate laminitis through their active involvement with the Laminitis Research Project. Horses that are diagnosed with laminitis and have not yet received treatment may be submitted for these case-based studies. Horse owners and veterinarians can also choose to help through fundraising at their equine facility, home, business or veterinary practice.

For more information about contributing to the Laminitis Research Project, visit www.aaepfoundation.org.


 TO LEARN MORE

© Fran Jurga and Hoofcare Publishing; Fran Jurga's Hoof Blog is a between-issues news service for subscribers to Hoofcare and Lameness Journal. Please, no use without permission. You only need to ask. This blog may be read online at the blog page, checked via RSS feed, or received via a digest-type email (requires signup in box at top right of blog page). To subscribe to Hoofcare and Lameness (the journal), please visit the main site, www.hoofcare.com, where many educational products and media related to equine lameness and hoof science can be found. Questions or problems with this blog? Send email to blog@hoofcare.com.  
Follow Hoofcare + Lameness on Twitter: @HoofcareJournal
Read this blog's headlines when you "like" the Hoofcare Facebook Page
 

Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any direct compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned, other than Hoofcare Publishing. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Equine Lameness Investigator Peter Clegg Receives British Scientific Achievement Award


Professor Peter Clegg

Peter Clegg, Professor of Musculoskeletal Biology at Great Britain's University of Liverpool School of Veterinary Science, has been awarded the inaugural LitoVet Scientific Award from the Animal Health Trust (AHT).

The award recognizes the person or group whose clinical or scientific work has made a substantial difference to the equine veterinary world. Professor Clegg was announced as this year's recipient at the Trust's Equestrian Aards gala dinner held in London last week.

Professor Clegg said: “I am absolutely delighted and honored to receive the award. It is recognition for the efforts of a large number of highly talented individuals that I have been extremely fortunate to work with over the last 10 years.

“Research is very much a team endeavor and this award recognizes the efforts of numerous PhD students, research assistants, and academic and veterinary colleagues who have contributed to the research which I have been fortunate enough to have been involved in.”

(photo and information provided by the University of Liverpool)

 TO LEARN MORE

Read about the many areas of Professor Clegg's research at the University of Liverpool

Read about the equine research at the Animal Health Trust


© Fran Jurga and Hoofcare Publishing; Fran Jurga's Hoof Blog is a between-issues news service for subscribers to Hoofcare and Lameness Journal. Please, no use without permission. You only need to ask. This blog may be read online at the blog page, checked via RSS feed, or received via a digest-type email (requires signup in box at top right of blog page). To subscribe to Hoofcare and Lameness (the journal), please visit the main site, www.hoofcare.com, where many educational products and media related to equine lameness and hoof science can be found. Questions or problems with this blog? Send email to blog@hoofcare.com.  
Follow Hoofcare + Lameness on Twitter: @HoofcareJournal
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Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any direct compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned, other than Hoofcare Publishing. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.



Thursday, November 03, 2011

Prascend® PPID (Equine Cushings Disease) Treatment Approved by FDA for US Horses


Maybe I'm biased, but I thought that the CSI (Cushings Scene Investigation) ad run by Boehringer-Ingelheim Vetmedica in British horse magazines was the most clever horse ad so far this year. It heralded the introduction of Prascend to treat Cushings-suffering horses; Prascend will soon be available in the USA.

The following press release is not an ad, it is published here as a "heads up". Anyone involved in the world of Hoofcare + Lameness is going to hear about this. Farriers and veterinarians will be asked questions by horseowners about this medication, and you need to know about how pergolide has evolved into Prascend®.

Prascend has been available in the United Kingdom for a few months, and Boehringer-Ingelheim Vetmedica has launched an awareness campaign there to urge horse owners to have their horses tested for PPID. I don't know yet what B-I has planned in the USA, but I feel confident in saying that "this is news".

In 2007, this blog reported that a potential crisis loomed for horseowners who were treating the symptoms of their horses' PPID condition with Permax (pergolide). (See links at end of this blog post.) The medication was taken from the market temporarily because of problems with human prescriptions. Before long, it became available again in the compounded form, which many horse owners ordered directly and in different forms.

Compounding pharmacies have been at the center of a controversy in the veterinary industry. At this time, it is too early to give a reliable answer whether compounded (and less expensive) pergolide will remain an option for horseowners as pill-only Prascend enters the marketplace. Ideally, horseowners will have safe and multiple alternatives to keep their horses comfortable.

Much more information will be available at or following the AAEP Convention in San Antonio later this month.
 

Everyone can recognize the advanced PPID (Cushing disease) horse. But laminitis and stretched white lines in younger horses may not seem to be related to PPID until much later, when a definitive diagnosis is made. Only careful testing will discern if horses without obvious signs suffer from PPID. (photo provided by Dr. Christian A. Bingold)

Boehringer Ingelheim’s Prascend® Approved for PPID in Horses
Product is the first and only FDA-approved treatment for the management of PPID.

ST. JOSEPH, Mo. (November 2, 2011) – Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. (BIVI), has received approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to market Prascend® (pergolide mesylate), for treatment of clinical signs associated with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID), also known as equine Cushing’s disease.

PRASCEND is the first and only FDA-approved product for the management of PPID in horses. (1) Administered in tablet form, treatment with PRASCEND can improve the quality of life for PPID-affected horses by managing clinical signs and decreasing the risk of complications of the disease, including those that have the potential to be life-threatening.

It is estimated that one in seven horses over the age of 15 has PPID (2) and horses as young as seven years of age have been diagnosed with the disease (3). In addition, up to 70 percent of clinical laminitis cases also may be affected with underlying PPID4. The most common clinical signs of advanced-stage PPID that occur in horses are hirsutism (hypertrichosis) or an abnormal amount of hair growth, abnormal sweating, weight loss, muscle wasting, abnormal fat distribution, lethargy, laminitis, polyuria/polydipsia and chronic/recurrent infections.

“Unfortunately, PPID is not a curable disease,” says Dr. John Tuttle, BIVI equine technical services veterinarian. “However, PRASCEND does offer a safe and efficacious treatment option to veterinarians and horse owners that can help reduce the clinical signs of the disease and effectively improve the quality of life of infected horses.”

While PPID is typically considered a late-stage-of-life disease in the horse, Tuttle adds that with horse owner vigilance and regular veterinary care, the disease may be detected earlier.

“Because the early symptoms of PPID may be difficult to recognize, some horses with PPID may go undiagnosed until the disease becomes more advanced,” says Tuttle. “Through regular veterinary wellness exams, oftentimes the disease can be caught earlier. By beginning treatment in the earlier stages of the disease, we are able to reduce the risk of some of the potential complications associated with PPID, such as laminitis, recurring infections, dental disease and other potential issues of uncontrolled PPID.”


Farriers often notice the early signs of PPID in horses' feet while trimming. As Cushings diseases advances, farriers are challenged to keep PPID sufferers comfortable and manage any flare-ups of chronic lamiitis. (Massachusetts farrier Allie Hayes trimming a Cushings-affected pony, photo © Hoofcare Publishing)

Not only can PRASCEND aid in the management of clinical signs of disease, the FDA approval also assures the product has been thoroughly evaluated for safety and efficacy. In addition, PRASCEND has met the standards set forth by the FDA in regard to production to preserve its identity, strength, quality, purity and consistency from batch to batch, and the product has demonstrated stability and effectiveness over time through a variety of environmental conditions.

“We are excited to offer a treatment option for horses suffering from PPID,” says Tuttle. “We encourage horse owners to continue to work with their veterinarians to find the best treatment for their horse and are confident that PRASCEND can help make a difference in the lives of horses suffering from this disease.”

PPID horses may be quite thin under all that hair. Cushings sufferers are also believed to be more highly perceptible to worms than non-sufferers. Many people clip their long-haired horses to be more aware of body condition. (photo © Hoofcare Publishing)
PRASCEND is for use in horses only. PRASCEND has not been evaluated in breeding, pregnant or lactating horses. Refer to the package insert for complete product information or contact Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica at 800-325-9167.

(Hoof Blog note: A web address should be available soon.)

Reference:
  1.  PRASCEND® (pergolide mesylate) [Freedom of Information Summary]. St. Joseph, MO: Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc.; 2011.
  2. McGowan TW, Hodgson DR, McGowan CM. The prevalence of equine Cushing’s syndrome in aged horses. In: Proceedings from the 25th American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine Forum; June 6–9, 2007; Seattle, WA. Abstract 603.
  3. Schott HC. Pars pituitary intermedia dysfunction: challenges of diagnosis and treatment. In: Proceedings from the 52nd American Association of Equine Practitioners Annual Convention; December 2–6, 2006; San Antonio, TX.
  4. Donaldson MT. Evaluation of suspected pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction in horses with laminitis. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2004;224(7):1123–1127.

Send your message to thousands of blog readers with a post footer ad like this that links to your site! Call 978 281 3222 to buy inexpensive footer ads, sponsor a blog post, or reserve a sidebar block ad.

 TO LEARN MORE


AAEP Statement on FDA Withdrawal of Pergolide for Human Use: Will It Still Be Available for Horses?

Pergolide Cleared for Equine Veterinary Use by FDA

Laminitis Research: Australian Breakthrough on Insulin Function in Equine Foot

Too Fat? Too Thin? British Court Faces Conflict Over "Abused" Horse with Cushings Disease

Cornell Laminitis Research Beneficiary of Arabian Horse Foundation Grant to Study Genetic Markers in Equine Metabolic Syndrome and Cushings Disease

Equine Pituitary Dysfunction Test Choices Analyzed by New Bolton Center's Jill Beech VMD

Three Chimneys Farm Works to Help Slew 'o Gold Keep His Cool



© Fran Jurga and Hoofcare Publishing; Fran Jurga's Hoof Blog is a between-issues news service for subscribers to Hoofcare and Lameness Journal. Please, no use without permission. You only need to ask. This blog may be read online at the blog page, checked via RSS feed, or received via a digest-type email (requires signup in box at top right of blog page). To subscribe to Hoofcare and Lameness (the journal), please visit the main site, www.hoofcare.com, where many educational products and media related to equine lameness and hoof science can be found. Questions or problems with this blog? Send email to blog@hoofcare.com.  
Follow Hoofcare + Lameness on Twitter: @HoofcareJournal
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Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any direct compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned, other than Hoofcare Publishing. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.

Tuesday, November 01, 2011

Amputation and Prosthetics: Molly the Pony Leads a Parade of Animal Amputees Showing Off Their Artificial Limbs


Here's an old friend: Molly the Pony sent this blog into global "gone viral" paralysis in 2008 when we announced that a children's book had been written about the three-legged Hurricane Katrina survivor. Now she's a global celebrity, and in this little video, she leads a parade of proud prosthesis-wearing animal pals--and rightly so!

This video enhances a spectacular article in the October issue of WIRED Magazine about animal amputees. The music by the way, was a great choice, I thought. It's the uplifting Concerto in D Major for Viola (First Movement) by Stamitz.

This nice portrait of Molly by Adrian Gaut shows the pony who has become such a symbol of hope and resilience to people around the world. She met thousands of people as a star of the show at the 2010 Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games in Kentucky. Molly was abandoned when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans. Her barn collapsed around her but she survived--only to be attacked by a pit bull at her rescue farm. Surgeon Rustin Moore DVM at Louisiana State University's vet school (now at Ohio State) took a chance and amputated what was left of her right front leg to save her life. (photo: WIRED Magazine)
Check out WIRED's compelling portrait gallery of amputee animals who are living and moving again, thanks to prosthetic designs that are as creative and inspiring as the spunky animals who wear them.

WIRED story author Emily Anthes says she is working on a book about amputee animals.


If you're interested in what's being done to help animals in need of amputation surgery and prosthesis design, note that the BBC show The Bionic Vet was shown on cable in the USA this fall and now can be viewed as a pay-per-view on iTunes. The show highlights the groundbreaking work on British vet Noel Fitzpatrick. While this trailer is a bit dramatic, and Fitzpatrick can be that way sometimes too, the show really is excellent.


Here's a sample of a case from The Bionic Vet. I have a soft spot for Corgis. I just wish Noel Fitzpatrick had a soft spot for horses. Several other vets, including Dr Ric Redden in Versailles, Kentucky and Dr Ted Vlahos of Cody Equine Hospital in Wyoming are advocates for equine amputation in the United States and have helped a lot of horses.

 TO LEARN MORE


© Fran Jurga and Hoofcare Publishing; Fran Jurga's Hoof Blog is a between-issues news service for subscribers to Hoofcare and Lameness Journal. Please, no use without permission. You only need to ask. This blog may be read online at the blog page, checked via RSS feed, or received via a digest-type email (requires signup in box at top right of blog page). To subscribe to Hoofcare and Lameness (the journal), please visit the main site, www.hoofcare.com, where many educational products and media related to equine lameness and hoof science can be found. Questions or problems with this blog? Send email to blog@hoofcare.com.  
Follow Hoofcare + Lameness on Twitter: @HoofcareJournal
Read this blog's headlines when you "like" the Hoofcare + Lameness Facebook Page

 
Disclosure of Material Connection: I have not received any direct compensation for writing this post. I have no material connection to the brands, products, or services that I have mentioned, other than Hoofcare Publishing. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.