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Wednesday, January 24, 2018

USDA Invites Tennessee Walking Horse Owners, Trainers to Horseshoeing Clinic Aimed to Improve Horse Protection Act Compliance


This public announcement is provided by the US Department of Agriculture.


On February 3, 2018, USDA Animal Care and the S.H.O.W. horse industry organization will hold a shoeing clinic for trainers, exhibitors and owners who participate in events regulated under the Horse Protection Act to help these individuals better understand and follow the federal regulations.


As we head into the 2018 show season, the USDA and S.H.O.W. say that they believe noncompliance with shoeing and other equipment-related requirements may be easily prevented by promoting a shared understanding of the regulatory requirements.

USDA inspectors, along with designated qualified persons from the walking horse industry, will review shoeing measurements and perform hands-on demonstrations so everyone in attendance will gain a deeper understanding of the federal shoeing requirements. In addition, we will provide an overview of our entire inspection process – including a discussion regarding assessing compliance with the scar rule.

The clinic, which is free and open to the general public, will take place from 1-3 p.m. at the Calsonic Arena, located at 721 Whitthorne Street, Shelbyville, TN 37160. We will begin by gathering in the Hall of Fame Club.

“This event is a great opportunity for us to fully explain the requirements for proper shoeing so we can help people steer clear of noncompliance with the Horse Protection Act,” said Dr. Aaron Rhyner, Animal Care’s assistant director for operations. “We see this clinic as a tangible way to improve compliance for the benefit of all involved.”

(end of text provided by USDA)

• • • • •

Click this link to review the existing Horse Protection Act shoeing regulations (Section 11.2) to see what is and is not allowed.

Note: Under the current version of the Horse Protection Act, pad stacks and chains are legal equipment, subject to specifications outlined in the Act. The type of equipment on the horse Walk Time Charlie, shown in the photo above by Randall Saxton, would be legal, but still subject to inspection for compliance.



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