Related Posts with Thumbnails

Monday, August 02, 2010

Free Donkey Foot Care DVD for Farriers


The British-based Donkey Sanctuary has recently launched a new short film on DVD that provides visual and technical support for farriers about the fine points of donkey hoof care.
An Introduction to Donkey Foot Care is free to all farriers and their apprentices and has been produced by the donkey-welfare charity to pass on the latest advice based from the charity's own experiences in the care and management of donkeys. The film also identifies key differences between horses’ and donkeys’ feet.
There are four main chapters in the 15 minute film, including:
• the normal donkey foot
how to correctly trim a normal donkey foot
how to deal with seedy toe (a.k.a. "white line disease" in the USA); and
how to deal with trimming long feet.


Colin Goldsworthy trimming hooves
Colin Goldsworthy, who is one of the Sanctuary’s most experienced farriers and who demonstrates all farriery within the film, says: “If you are just starting out as a farrier or even if you’ve been in the trade for years, please do get in touch for a free copy of this DVD. The film has been produced for you and the advice within it has been derived from The Donkey Sanctuary’s vast experience, having cared for almost 14,500 donkeys over the past 40 years.”

The DVD is free on request only to qualified farriers and/or industry apprentices. To obtain a copy please send an email.

The Donkey Sanctuary also provides free information sheets and training to farriers.
 © Fran Jurga and Hoofcare Publishing Fran Jurga's Hoof Blog is a between-issues news service for subscribers to Hoofcare and Lameness Journal. Please, no use without permission. You only need to ask. This blog may be read online at the blog page, checked via RSS feed, or received via a digest-type email (requires signup in box at top right of blog page). To subscribe to Hoofcare and Lameness (the journal), please visit the main site, www.hoofcare.com, where many educational products and media related to equine lameness and hoof science can be found. Questions or problems with this blog? Send email to blog@hoofcare.com.

No comments: