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Monday, January 12, 2015

UC Davis Hosts 29th Charles Heumphreus Memorial Lecture for Farriers on January 24

Date: January 24, 2015
Time: 8:00 am - 4:30 pm
Location: Gladys Valley Hall, Room 1020, 
and covered arena at Large Animal Clinic
University of California at Davis Campus
Davis, California

Registration: There is no cost to attend, and you do not have to register for the morning lectures, but please register here or call 530-754-9223 for the afternoon lab as space is limited to 40 participants.

Note: This endowed lecture, now in its 29th year, is held in honor of Mr. Charles Heumphreus, the longtime UC Davis vet school farrier. In his memory, the event is open with no charge to farriers who would like to attend.


8:00 in Gladys Valley Hall, Room 1020: Registration and Welcome
8:30 – 9:15am: How surfaces affect injury and shoeing practices – Vern Dryden, DVM, CJF
9:30 – 10:15am: Shoeing sport horses with regards to effect of surfaces on needs – Dr. Dryden
10:30 – 12:00pm: Strengthening the veterinarian/farrier relationship through better communication - One community at a time - Bibi Freer, DVM

1:15 – 4:30pm (at covered arena, Large Animal Clinic)
“Farrier Jam Session” (Improving the Farrier-Veterinarian Relationship – One Horse at a Time)

Drs. Dryden and Freer will lead attending farriers and veterinarians through a “Farrier Jam Session”, beginning with gait assessment and radiographic acquisition/interpretation from the farrier and veterinarian standpoints. This will form the basis for group discussion about shoeing options after which decisions for shoeing will be made, either by consensus or vote. Forging demonstrations will relate to group recommendations.
(Limited to 40 Participants - Registration required)

Dr. Freer will bring her idea of a "Farrier Jam Session" west with her. This photo was taken at one of the sessions she hosted in North Carolina.


Vern Dryden, DVM, CJF"I am very honored to be involved with this lecture," Dr. Vern Dryden of Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital told The Hoof Blog.  "I will be presenting information on the effects surfaces have on shoeing for different disciplines and distal limb injuries in the sport horse.  Dr. Freer will be presenting information about vet farrier relations and her experience with a group called "farrier jam session". This is a group of vets and farriers in her area that get together periodically to work up cases and shoe the horse. I had the pleasure of being one of the farrier jam session clinicians back in October and it was a fun and enthusiastic group."

About Dr. Dryden: Raised on a cattle ranch in Arizona, Dr. Dryden worked with horses and followed in his father’s footsteps as a farrier. He graduated from Oklahoma State Horseshoeing School and qualified as a Certified Journeyman Farrier through the American Farrier's Association. Dr. Dryden is a 2007 graduate of Washington State University College of Veterinary Medicine where he was the resident farrier of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Dr. Dryden is now happy to be a partner at Rood and Riddle Equine Hospital where he specializes in Equine Podiatry.

Farrier Jam Session founders
Farrier jam session founders in North Carolina (left to right): Todd Danielson, Darryl Meyer, Dr. Bibi Freer, and Eric Richard.

Dr. Bibi Freer, North Carolina equine practitoner
"I am very excited to have been asked to speak at the Charles Heumphreus  Lecture this year," Dr. Bibi Freer explained to The Hoof Blog in January. "The relationship between veterinarians and farriers is so important for optimal care of the horse and good service to clients. A good working relationship also makes the job more enjoyable."

About Dr. Freer: Since receiving her DVM from North Carolina State University in 1988, Dr. Freer has been both a solo practitioner and a large practice owner in North Carolina. In 2006, Dr. Freer returned to solo practice in Tryon, NC where she focuses on reproduction, pleasure and performance horses. Dr. Freer’s passion for the horse's foot led her to develop events for farriers and veterinarians to come together to evaluate, radiograph, and shoe two horses one evening per month in her practice area. These meetings are termed “Farrier Jam Sessions” as an homage to her background in Appalachian and bluegrass music. Dr. Freer is also a member of AAEP’s Veterinarian-Farrier Task Force and a Farrier Short Course instructor for veterinary student chapters of the AAEP.

Updates may be posted on the UC Davis event web page

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Patrick Reilly said...

Why is it that "better communications between veterinarians and farriers" lectures seem to always be delivered by veterinarians?

Fran Jurga said...

It does seem that way sometimes, Patrick, but not always. I would say this, though: it's my observation that vet conferences will have a specific lecture on vet-farrier relations, presented by a vet.

Farrier conferences often invite a vet to speak, on the other hand, and at some point the subject inevitably comes around to the way that vets and farriers work together. It's just not listed on the program.

Anonymous said...

But it is not often that a vet conference invites a farrier to speak on that topic. Can you recall an instance?

Patrick Reilly said...

But it is not often that a vet conference invites a farrier to speak on that topic. Can you recall an instance?

Fran Jurga said...

It doesn't seem like vet conferences often have farriers speak at all, which concerns me. But I'm sure I could find examples, Pat. Don't make me go hunting!

That said, Paul Goodness is speaking at one at Virginia Tech this week, on "Therapeutic Shoeing and the Compromised Hoof". I'd like to hear that.

At the same conference, Dr Scott Pleasant, Director of Equine Podiatry Service at Virginia Tech, is speaking on "The Veterinarian-Farrier Team". I'm sure he'll do a good job.

Keeping score doesn't accomplish much. Writing to conference organizers with suggestions is helpful sometimes, since they often are unfamiliar with the field and are at a loss for ideas, which could be why "vet-farrier relations" lectures show up so often on conference programs. (Just a guess.)

I've never heard anyone say s/he was going to a conference because of interest in a vet-farrier communications/relations lecture. It's usually when I see people checking their email, which is another subject entirely!